Lesson Plans

Lesson Plan #1: Unreliable Narrators
(Video Project)

Timeline
4-6 60 minute class sessions
1 class session for reading, in-class discussion, and introduction of video assignment
Lab time for videos (2-3 class sessions)
Video Presentations (1-2 sessions)

Summary
This week-long mini-unit on unreliable narrators will begin with the following lesson: The instructor will begin by reading aloud “The Tell Tale Heart” by Edgar Allen Poe. Battery-powered candles will be turned on to evoke drama and mystery. After the reading, the instructor will introduce the idea of unreliable narration through a series of questions to the class. There should be an attempt to cause some cognitive dissonance via challenging students’ notions that narrators always tell the truth. Consider other, more contemporary, texts students may have read to aid in their understanding of the concept. The instructor will then explain the Video Assignment wherein students will create a video of themselves telling a story in which they are lying/being unreliable without giving it away completely to show their understanding of the concepts covered in class.

Learning Standards (BC’s New English 9 Curriculum)
Curricular Competencies:

  • Transform ideas and information to create original texts
  • Use appropriate features, forms, and genres according to audience, purpose, and message
  • Use and experiment with oral storytelling processes
  • Use writing and design processes to plan, develop, and create engaging and meaningful texts
  • Explain how literary elements, techniques, and devices, enhance and shape text meaning
  • Respond to text in personal, creative, and critical ways
    Think critically, creatively, and reflectively to explore ideas within, between, and beyond texts

Content Areas:

  • Form and function of story/text
  • Literary Elements of story/text (narrator, unreliable narrator, POV)
  • Reading strategies (using contextual clues, predicting, making inferences)
  • Metacognitive strategies (develop awareness of self as a reader/writer)
  • Features of oral language (tone, volume, inflection, pace, gestures)
  • Presentation techniques (medium chosen should reflect audience and purpose)

Materials/Resources
Battery-powered Candles for dramatic reading
Teacher and student copies of The Tell Tale Heart
Video Assignment student handout (with explanation, checklist, & assessment rubric)
Access to computer lab multiple days in one week for students to work on Videos

Special Considerations/Prior Knowledge
As the first introduction to “Unreliable Narrators” no prior understanding is necessary. The concept of “Narration” may also be new, but likely a review for most Grade 9 English students. We will discuss the differences of “Point of View” and how POV impacts believability of narration.

Students do not need to be experts in terms of understanding technology for their video creation. They can use any sort of filming technique/app they feel most comfortable with. The instructor will encourage a variety of file types. The videos are intended to be simple and easy to make – the focus of assessment is mainly on the students thinking critcally about what a reliable narrator looks/sounds/behaves like vs. an unreliable one. The assignment is an opportunity for students to explore those ideas creatively through low-pressure acting/video presentation.

If students have disabilities or are not capable of creating a video for whatever reason, the instructor can adapt the lesson to having the students simply perform their story/lie in front of the class or for the instructor alone to show their understanding of narration without the technology component.

Goals

  1. Understand what Unreliable Narrator means
  2. Have some strategies to discern whether a narrator is reliable or not
  3. Be able to take on the role of an unreliable narrator and demonstrate their understanding
  4. Students will employ “Design Thinking” by empathizing with unreliable narrators, defining what it means to be an unreliable narrator, coming up with ideas and examples of unreliable narrators, prototyping their own version of an unreliable narrator through the video assignment, and then presenting that video to receive feedback and possibly iterate.

Objectives
Create: students will produce new/original work through their Unreliable Narrator Videos
Evaluate: students will have the chance to decide what they think they know and understand about the narrator of The Tell Tale Heart during class discussion following the dramatic reading
Analyze: As a class, students will analyze how we know the narrator of The Tell Tale Heart is unreliable based on literary devices, contextual clues, language choice, etc.
Apply: students will apply their understanding of Unreliable Narrators in their video presentation
Understand: Throughout the lesson students will explore POV, Narration, & Unreliable Narrators

Introduction/Hook
Students will come into a classroom illuminated by candles for a dramatic reading of “The Tell Tale Heart.” If possible, desks/tables will be rearranged so that students can sit in a circle. The teacher will read out the story with interludes to allow students to discuss what they think is happening in the story up until that point (eg. Who is the narrator talking to? What do we think he has done to the old man?). Students will have an opportunity to write down their own answers individually before sharing with the class. After finishing the story, students will be able to reflect on their predictions. For example, did they trust the narrator, why or why not? Were there clues that the narrator might not be reliable? Ideally, the students will then be able to use these clues that influenced their predictions in creating their own video of an unreliable narrator.

Tasks/Activities

  1. The instructor will facilitate the dramatic reading and discussion of “The Tell Tale Heart.”
  2. The instructor will introduce the concept of the unreliable narrator and go over characteristics of an unreliable narrator with students, and will link specific characteristics back to narrator of “The Tell Tale Heart.”
  3. The instructor will introduce the video assignment, pass out student handouts, and then as a class go through expectations, explain the rationale behind the project, and provide examples of techniques that they may want to use in developing their own unreliable narrator for videos. A list may be written up on chart paper or on the whiteboard for student reference.
  4. The instructor will present Annette Jung’s animated “The Tell Tale Heart” Youtube video for the students to view and get an idea of how their video may be completed. Instructor will then facilitate a discussion that identifies differences in the perception of the narrator between the reading and the video so students have a better understanding of what unreliable narrators may look like.

Closing Activity
Students will be shown a sample animation of “A Tell Tale Heart” by Annette Jung. In this animation, before any speaking begins we see the narrator in an asylum. This changes our view of the narrator from the beginning, we now are less likely to place our trust in the narrator. After watching the animation, students will discuss a few differences between they noticed between the read-aloud story and the video. This animation demonstrates different methods that students may want to use to alter and influence the interpretations of their narrators when they create their own video. Students will then be allowed to spend the remaining class time getting into groups and beginning to plan their video project.

Assessment/Evaluation
Formative Assessment during Lesson 1 and Computer Lab time:
Students should be engaged in the text while the Instructor reads aloud “The Tell Tale Heart”. Students’ participation in class discussion will vary: (may be through answering questions, posing questions/ideas of their own, creating connections, writing notes, etc.)

Assessment of Video Presentation:
Students need to create a 1-5 minute video (using any sort of technology/app they wish)
Students create a video of themselves telling an original story in the role of an unreliable narrator. Students need to employ various techniques (language use, rhetoric, physicality, intonation, tics, etc) to subtly reveal themselves as unreliable without giving it away completely (use the text of Tell Tale Heart and other YouTube videos as examples). Video should make creative use of music, noises, lighting etc. to evoke appropriate mood/mystery.

Extension/Continuation
The concept of “Unreliable Narrator” will come up in other units and lessons so we can refer back to this lesson to build students’ understanding overall. It could be especially useful in connecting to a lesson on media, bias, propaganda, rhetoric, etc – we could look at current and past events in the news to apply their knowledge to real-world events.

Notes
A short teacher reflection may be completed at the end of each lesson and a longer, more detailed final reflection should be written up after the student projects are completed and presented.

References
https://curriculum.gov.bc.ca/curriculum/english-language-arts/9
https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/blooms-taxonomy/
https://americanenglish.state.gov/files/ae/resource_files/the_tell-tale_heart_0.pdf


Lesson Plan #2: Revolution &
Creative Design Process
(Cross-Curricular Board Game Project)

Timeline
(To be introduced as the wrap-up/final project of Revolution unit in Socials Studies 9)
(Cross-curricular with English 9 by focusing on creatively designing a multimodal project that demonstrates one’s critical understanding of a given subject/text)

1 lesson (to review topic, introduce board game project, & class time to get started)
3 sessions of in-class time for student planning, designing, & construction of board games
1 session to present and play each other’s board games
Total Time = 1 week / 5 60 minute classes (Monday-Friday ideally but not necessarily)

Summary
This project will be the culminating activity for a unit on Revolution in Social Studies 9. Students will have already learned about several examples of revolutions (e.g., political, social, economic, and technological) and can refer back to those examples when determining a theme for their project. The first lesson will begin with a review of key concepts related to Revolution, then the board game project will be introduced in full, explaining the rationale, requirements, and timeline. Students will be placed in groups by the instructor and will have time in class to brainstorm and determine what type of revolution they are interested in building a board game about. From there, for the next 3 class sessions, students will have time to develop their project, using a design process of planning, developing, and creating as a collaborative group. On the final day, students will present their board game, and everyone will get to view each other’s work and play one another’s games.

Learning Standards
(Social Studies 9)
Big Ideas:

  • Disparities in power alter the balance of relationships between individuals and between societies.
  • Emerging ideas and ideologies profoundly influence societies and events.

Curricular Competencies:

  • Use Social Studies inquiry processes and skills to ask questions; gather, interpret, and analyze ideas; and communicate findings and decisions
  • Assess the significance of people, places, events, or developments, and compare varying perspectives on their historical significance at particular times and places, and from group to group
  • Assess how prevailing conditions and the actions of individuals or groups affect events, decisions, or developments
  • Make reasoned ethical judgments about actions in the past and present, and determine appropriate ways to remember and respond

Content Areas:

  • Political, social, economic, and technological revolutions
  • Local, regional, and global conflicts

(English 9)
Big Ideas:

  • Exploring helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others/to the world

Curricular Competencies:

  • Synthesize ideas from a variety of sources to build understanding
  • Exchange ideas and viewpoints to build shared understanding and extend thinking
  • Use writing and design processes to plan, develop, and create engaging and meaningful texts
  • Use an increasing repertoire of conventions of Canadian spelling, grammar, and punctuation

Content Areas:

  • Conventions (common practices in all standard punctuation use, in capitalization, in quoting, and in Canadian spelling)
  • Presentation Techniques (any presentation should reflect an appropriate choice of medium for the purpose and the audience, and demonstrate thought and care in organization)

Materials/Resources

  • Student handout x30ish – and an e-copy posted on class website/email
    • This handout would have an explanation of the project, a list of game elements, a checklist for completing the board game project, as well as the grading rubric.
  • A selection of materials that students may use to complete their board game, but are not required to use if they have their own design concept/idea. (These materials would be offered so that if there are students with limited or no access to materials outside of class then they can still complete the activity)
    • Blank and coloured paper
    • Cardstock/cardboard
    • Markers, crayons
    • Scissors, tape, glue
  • If possible, bring in examples of student-created board games to give the class some ideas

Special Considerations/Prior Knowledge
Students will have already learned (or at least be familiar with) the concepts focused on in the revolution unit. The first lesson will review the key concepts to ensure students understand what is most significant to consider for their board game project. Students may or may not have completed a similar project before, so the instructor should be aware of various levels of confidence when beginning the design process. Some groups may need more assistance than others, but hopefully each group has at least one member who is able to support the others when it comes to designing.

If students have learning or physical disabilities that prevent them from completing the project, they can still participate by being a part of another group, joining in on the aspects of the design process that they are most comfortable with. If even this much contribution is not possible, those students may have the project adapted so that they can find a different, already completed board game, and consider how they might make it about revolution. Or, if they have strengths with computers, they might be able to build a game online, rather than using physical materials.

All students will get to participate in playing the completed board games on the final lesson day.

Goals

  1. Explore a type of revolution that interests them to better understand themselves and make connections to others/to the world
  2. Collaborate by exchanging ideas/viewpoints to build shared understanding & extend thinking
  3. Use a design processes to plan, develop, and create a project that is engaging and thoughtful

Objectives

Create: Design and physically construct an original Revolution board game.

Analyze: Compare and contrast revolutions to the key elements reviewed in class. Test various game designs to find one that works for the project.

Apply: Use the knowledge acquired in the Revolution unit to create their board game. Schedule/use class time appropriately.

Understand: Identify the key elements of the revolution(s) they are using in their game. Explain rules clearly (in writing) to enable their classmates to play their game.

Introduction/Hook

  • Review key concepts from unit on “Revolution”
    • Shift of ideologies and ideas
    • Desire for change (political, social, economic, or technological)
    • Social, political, or economic polarization
    • Technological advances
    • Inciting incident (usually)

Tasks/Activities
Upon reviewing the key concepts, the instructor will introduce the final project of the Revolution unit. In groups of 3-4 (determined by the instructor), students must create a board game on the topic of revolution. To begin, in their groups, students must pick a type of revolution (e.g., political, social, economic, or technological) to base their game around. They may choose to focus on one or more of the same type of revolution, but must use specific revolutions that have not already been studied in class. Otherwise, the rules, scoring, design, questions, etc. are up to the students to determine. They will, however, be provided with written instructions, a list of game elements to consider, a checklist, and the assessment rubric (in attached Appendix).  The instructor will bring in examples of past projects or general board games that the students can use for inspiration.  This first class will be used for planning and concept design. Students will have three additional classes to complete their project in full.

Closing Activity
On the final day allotted for this lesson (5th class or Friday), students will have the opportunity to present their finished projects, teach their peers how to play their game, and then engage in the other games as well. A gallery walk will be set up so everyone can appreciate each group’s final product.

Indigenous Ways of Knowing

  • Learning is holistic, reflexive, reflective, experiential, and relational (focused on connectedness, on reciprocal relationships, and a sense of place). Students will reflect on what they have learned about the revolutions studied in class in order to incorporate key elements of a revolution in their game.
  • Learning involves recognizing the consequences of one’s actions. This concept will be involved in the initial learning of how revolutions come to be (what are the individual roles and actions? What were the consequences?).
  • Learning ultimately supports the well-being of the self, the family, the community, the land, the spirits, and the ancestors. This concept will be supported by students creating a game to better understand a specific revolution. They are supporting their individual and classmates’ learning.
  • Learning involves patience and time. Students will begin to understand this concept throughout the course. Specifically, they will have to be patient with one another as this is project has them working in small groups.

Assessment/Evaluation

  • During class time, students will be formatively assessed on their understanding of the lesson and their ability to be on task during work time – no marks towards final grade.
  • Instructor will circulate during each lesson, to assist with potential confusion or struggles that may come up during any portion of the board game design process (brainstorming, planning, designing, construction).
  • The final board game project will be assessed using attached grading rubric (see Appendix ) and will go towards the student’s final grade.

Extension/Continuation
This project relates to other units within Social Studies 9. Some of the revolutions students may choose to examine for their project will explore: the effects of imperialism and colonialism – compare the impacts of colonialism in the Haitian Revolution to the (continued) effects on Indigenous peoples; nationalism and the development of modern nation-states (compare and contrast nation-building in Canadian Confederation and the American Revolution); local, regional, and global conflicts (North-West Rebellion, Red River Rebellion, Fraser Canyon War, Russian Revolution, Chinese Rebellion, World War I, etc.); and discriminatory policies, attitudes, and historical wrongs (Internment of Japanese Canadians, Chinese Head Tax, Haitian Slavery, etc.). There is significant overlap between this project (and unit) and the content to be covered in Social Studies 9. As a class, we could refer back to this lesson as a way of cementing knowledge and enlarging on concepts that arise in other units.

The English 9 curricular areas met in this lesson certainly come up again and again in English, Social Studies, as well as other coursework. This project expects students to question and consider the relevance of information, synthesize their ideas, and use critical thinking approaches to develop a board game that utilizes class notes and learnings in an engaging, fun way. While they may not create a board game in other situations, the development of these skills will be significant in future learning. This lesson also expects students to collaborate and work efficiently as a group to design a board game from scratch (brainstorming, planning, sketching, writing, constructing, presenting, etc); again, these skills are useful in nearly every class and lesson – not just for this particular project.

Notes
A short teacher reflection should be completed at the end of each lesson and a longer, more detailed final reflection should be written up after the student projects are completed and presented.

References
http://coursespaces.uvic.ca/pluginfile.php/885065/mod_resource/content/1/EDCI_336_Module8_Gamification.pdf
https://curriculum.gov.bc.ca/curriculum/social-studies/9
https://curriculum.gov.bc.ca/curriculum/english-language-arts/9
https://cft.vanderbilt.edu/guides-sub-pages/blooms-taxonomy/
http://www.fnesc.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/PUB-LFP-POSTER-Principles-of-Learning-First-Peoples-poster-11×17.pdf

Appendix (Student Handouts)
Over the next four classes, you and your group members will be designing your own board game on the topic of Revolution. Your group must pick one type of revolution (political, social, economic, or technological) to base your game around.  You may choose to focus on one or more of the same type of revolution, but must use specific revolution(s) that have not already been studied in class. Otherwise, you make the rules, the design, the questions, etc.  Use the checklist and assessment rubric (below) to help guide you in your planning. Have fun!

Elements of Games – consider including some or all of these when making your board game:

  1. Rules
  2. Competition
  3. Chance
  4. Points/Scoring System
  5. Objective/Goal
  6. Cooperation
  7. Risk
  8. Storylines
  9. Characters/Avatars/Roles
  10. Aesthetics

Student Checklist for Completing Board Game Project:

  • Brainstorm the following information as a group:
    • What is the object of your board game?
    • What equipment is needed to play your board game?
    • How is the board game set up/organized?
    • What are the rules of your board game?
    • What will the final product look like when it’s finished?
  • Determine the questions/content (related to “Revolution” unit) that you will use in your game
    • Think about how many questions/cards you will need
    • How will the course material be incorporated into the overall gameplay/board design? (create the world)
  • Create the board/pieces/cards/any other physical materials you need
  • Type up a final draft of the rules and directions for your board game (be sure to edit carefully)
  • Play through your game several times to find any mistakes, and make adjustments as needed

Assessment:
Your games will be assessed based on the following criteria:

  •   Game content is related to “Revolution” unit using key terms, concepts, and notes – is it based on your learning?
  •   Directions and rules of the game are easy to understand, and explained thoroughly – do you know how do you play?
  •   The board game is unique and creative in its concept, rules, or design – is it appealing to play?
  • Accurate grammar, spelling, and punctuation of directions/rules/game board – is it well edited?
CATEGORY

Exceeds Expectations

Meets Expectations

Not Quite There

Game Content

All information in the game is correct and relates to the topic of Revolution. Most information is correct, and relates to the topic of Revolution. Some information is correct, and relates to Revolution.

Rules & Directions

Rules and directions were very clear, and were understandable so that all could easily participate without any confusion Rules and directions were mostly understandable so that all could participate with little confusion. Rules and directions were only somewhat understandable, causing confusion when playing.

Uniqueness & Creativity

The group put a great deal of thought into making the game interesting and fun to play as shown by creative design, game pieces and/or game objective. The group put some thought into making the game interesting and fun to play as shown by the design, game pieces and/or game objective. The group tried to make the game interesting and fun, but more time needed to be devoted to the overall presentation.

Grammar, Punctuation, and Spelling

No errors on board, rules, directions, cards, or any other part of game. Some errors on board, rules, directions, cards, or any other part of game.

Many errors on board, rules, directions, cards, or any other part of game.


Cross-Curricular Inquiry Strategies
Core Competencies

French Language Arts

Communication

  • Student discussion on a topic related to la francophonie in groups
  • Mind map to organize ideas
  • Student reporting out in groups of 4

Creative Thinking

  • Students construct poems based on a piece of literature (in the theme of)
  • Students are working with the theme of “food”: create an ideal meal you would make for your parents
  • Students examine newspaper articles on current events/mysteries and are asked to recreate their own with what they think happened/would happen

Critical Thinking

  • Students looks at a piece of writing (poem, short paragraph) on a defined topic and are asked to take a position
  • Respond to a piece of work (poem, short story, article) that challenges what we think and know about a topic (this can be made up, ex. the earth is flat, the sun isn’t a star; or real ex any current new profiles)
  • Students write a reflection on any piece of work they have done to explain what they learned and how they arrived to any final product (ex. thought process, reasoning etc)

Positive Personal & Cultural Identity

  • I am from poem/We are from poem
  • Culture Fair (students present a project on their origins)
  • Mindmap/Illustrated timeline of their life

Personal Awareness & Responsibility

  • Students brainstorm as a class their own criteria to agree on a rubric for an assignment
  • Students self-evaluate their work to be submitted (ex. they indicate how they have met or exceeded expectations for a specific assignment)
  • “Where will you be in 5 years” : students will goal set and indicate where they want to be in 5 years and indicate how they will get there

Social Responsibility

  • A speaker will come into class and present on a specific topic that informs on culture. Students will write a reflection about how it is important to them as individuals in a community
  • Students will learn about an aspect of colonisation (France and Acadie) and learn about how people had been treated. Students will be asked to identify problems and provide potential problem solving strategies
  • Debate: students will be asked to take a position and defend it regardless of beliefs. Students will come together at the end and collaborate on the issue and examine the different points of view to be able to advocate for others


English Language Arts


Communication

  • Students interview each other – building oral speaking skills and safe-space environment
  • Students read their favourite fairy tale/picture book aloud followed by class discussion
  • Students discuss ideas about an inquiry/research project either orally or in written form

Creative Thinking

  • Students read a portion of a text and are asked to write their own idea for the ending
  • Found poem activity – students highlight/blackout prose text to create a found poem
  • Students are given time in class to do “freewrites” where they can be creative for the sake of it, without any evaluative marks

Critical Thinking

  • Blame-ometer – a character is put “on trial” so students can critique their behaviour and determine motivations – who is to blame for the deaths of Romeo & Juliet for example
  • Students write an alternative version of a well-known story – ex. the Wolf’s perspective in “The True Story of the Three Little Pigs” by Jon Scieszka
  • As a class students will consider what makes something “good writing” – looking at the notion of text in general, comparing film and book versions of stories, wordless narratives, popular fiction, etc.

Positive Personal & Cultural Identity

  • Who Am I Silhouette – Students fill in a silhouette of their head with what makes them who they are (family & friends, pets, hobbies/skills, music, books, sports, traits, etc.) these will be displayed around the room so everyone can learn about each other
  • Students collect examples of literary figures/characters who represent their sense of their own identity. Present in a creative way (Collage, PowerPoint/Prezzi, Poster, etc.)
  • Students write a personal narrative on their best/worst day of their life

Personal Awareness & Responsibility

  • Students use self-evaluation and reflection writings/journal entries to take accountability for their own work and effort
  • Students brainstorm ideas for potential careers/futures (can be as unrealistic as they’d like), then they must mindmap how they will actually make that future possible
  • Students determine their own grading rubric for their inquiry projects

Social Responsibility

  • Students will explore their own heritage and family tree to find connections to other cultures as a larger lesson on how we are all interconnected
  • Students research various issues, pick a specific issue that matters to them, and brainstorm a plan of action for how they could impact change.
  • Instructor invites a speaker to come in and shed light on an issue or provide a personal perspective on an event so students can learn about and be exposed to another culture/perspective/belief firsthand, rather than through research


Cross-Curricular Overlap

Communication

  • Students discussing their ideas with one another or as a class discussion
  • Students working individually and then reporting out their ideas
  • Creative ways to build communication skills (not just talking but also using strategies like creating mind maps or conducting writing activities to share ideas with class)

Creative Thinking

  • Bringing in exemplar texts as models for students producing their own writing
  • Texts can serve as a means for inspiring student writing (when not directly mimicking)
  • Creative writing assignments are for the sake of expression, rather than evaluative grades, in an effort to foster genuine creative thought – marks kill the creative process

Critical Thinking

  • Analyze (writing/film/song/event/whatever) – requires thorough investigation
  • Question (both the primary text and your own beliefs) and format an eloquent response
  • Reflect (on your findings, your preconceived notions, your new beliefs, etc.)

Positive Personal & Cultural Identity

  • Creative/illustrated/multimodal ways for students to present who they feel they are
  • Activities in which students relating themselves to a grander idea of what identity means – they are only a single piece of cake from a whole platter – part vs. the whole
  • Lessons in which the instructor has students build up towards understanding and empathy of other cultures

Personal Awareness & Responsibility

  • Students participate in self-evaluation and reflection writing to strengthen awareness
  • Students are involved in creating rubrics/criteria so they are accountable for their work
  • Students complete assignments wherein they consider their future, working on the development of their long-term planning and goal-setting skills

Social Responsibility

  • Instructor brings in a community speaker rather than trying to organize class field trips
  • Students research an issue/problem in the world and discover ways in which they could make a difference (without the expectation that they actually change the world)
  • Service learning – getting students connected with their broader sense of community

Cross-Curricular & Multi-Modal
Mini-Unit Plan Outline

Concept:
Students develop a stronger sense of their personal identity – in relation to their peers, their community, and larger notions of the world – through the lens of a language arts classroom.

Summary:
In this 2 week mini-unit plan, students will engage in several activities in an effort to better understand their own identity as developed in a language arts classroom. The unit will begin with an introductory lesson wherein the instructor will guide students in a class brainstorming session on ideas of personal and cultural identity as revealed in aspects of language arts (writing, reading, speaking, listening, representing, & viewing). The students will then explore several texts (of a variety of writing styles & from diverse cultural backgrounds) to become more familiar with notions of text as well as more educated in cultural works outside of their own heritage. They will then produce a creative writing text (mimicking an exemplar chosen from the anthology ). This writing piece is intended to illustrate how they think of themselves/their identity/culture. They will be guided through the writing process and will be provided class time in a computer lab to effectively complete this assignment. The students will then have the opportunity to participate in a mask-making activity wherein they literally construct a physical representation of their identity. The project will be framed by an introduction on the meaning of masks and mask-making, a discussion on the significance of mask symbolism, and will culminate with a short piece of reflective writing. Finally, on the last day(s) of the unit, the students will present their mask (and possibly share from their writing piece if they so wish) in a low-pressure sharing circle.

Big Ideas/Goals:

  • While all 6 Core Competencies can/will be addressed in this unit, the major focus will be placed on students developing stronger “Positive Personal & Cultural Identity”
  • “Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world” (from BC’s New English 9 Curriculum)
  • “Acquiring French provides opportunities to explore our own cultural identity from a new perspective” (from BC’s New Core French 9 Curriculum)

Materials
Mask-making materials (including, but not limited to):

  • cardboard, cereal boxes
  • paper, newspaper, cardstock
  • glue, tape, adhesives, flour and water
  • feathers, glitter, sequins,
  • paint, markers, crayons
  • chopsticks, wood, branches
  • Access to the computer lab multiple times over the 2 weeks
  • A range of diverse texts (both in writing style/form/mode, and cultural background)
  • Chart-paper &/or space on the whiteboard for class brainstorming/mindmapping

 


EDCI 352 – Mini Unit Plan Outline

Developing Positive Personal &
Cultural Identity Through Language Arts

Summary:

In this 2 week mini-unit plan, students will engage in several activities in an effort to better understand their own identity as developed in a language arts classroom. The unit will begin with an introductory lesson wherein the instructor will guide students in a class brainstorming session on ideas of personal and cultural identity as revealed in aspects of language arts. The students will then explore several texts (of a variety of modes & from diverse cultures) to become more familiar with notions of text, as well as become more educated in cultural works outside of their own heritage. They will then produce a personal writing text (mimicking an exemplar chosen from the anthology). This writing piece is intended to illustrate what they consider to be their identity/culture. They will be guided through the writing process and will be provided class time in a computer lab to effectively complete this assignment. The students will then participate in a mask-making activity wherein they literally construct a physical representation of their identity. The project will be framed by an introduction on the meaning of masks, a discussion on the significance of mask symbolism, and will culminate with a short piece of reflective writing. Finally, the students will present their masks (and possibly share from their personal writing piece if they so wish) in a low-pressure sharing circle.

Cross-Curricular Competencies
Thinking

·       Critical

·       Creative

·       Reflective

Communication

·       Language and Symbols

·       Digital Literacy

Personal and Social

·       Positive Personal and Cultural Identity

·       Personal Awareness & Responsibility

·       Social Awareness & Responsibility

Big Ideas: (WHY this unit is of importance to your students’ learning?)
BC Curriculum Big Ideas:

“Exploring stories and other texts helps us understand ourselves and make connections to others and to the world” (English 9)

“Acquiring French provides opportunities to explore our own cultural identity from a new perspective” (French 9)

Why is this important:

  • By learning about other cultures students may develop a more positive sense of themselves
  • Students will be more successful in their daily lives and future endeavors if they strive to be global citizens)
  • Opening their minds to other perspectives may increase students’ respect for themselves and other people/cultures

Curricular Competencies

Students will be able to:

Content

Students will know and understand:

WHAT students will be learning – goals for the unit

  • Describe cultural practices, traditions and attitudes in various Francophone regions and describe their role in cultural identity
  • Recognize how Francophone culture is expressed through creative works
  • Recognize and identify the role of personal, social, and cultural contexts, values, and perspectives in texts
  • Recognize how language constructs personal, social, and cultural identity
  • Construct meaningful personal connections between self, text, and world
  • Exchange ideas and viewpoints to build shared understanding and extend thinking
  • Use writing processes to plan, develop, and create engaging and meaningful texts for a variety of purposes and audiences
  • Assess and refine texts to improve their clarity, effectiveness, and impact according to purpose, audience, and message
  • A general overview of mask and mask-making culture and the significance of masks as a way of representing one’s culture/identity
  • Using projects like mask-making, reflection writing, and personal writing as strategies for representing their identity/culture
  • Elements of the writing process such as pre-writing (in this case reading a variety of texts to determine a particular style to emulate in their own writing), as well as drafting, revising, editing, and producing a final draft
  • Presentation techniques – students will produce a personal writing piece their personal mask project, along with a piece of reflective writing. For the final day, the instructor will encourage students to present any/all of their projects as a way of presenting their newfound sense of positive personal & cultural identity

Sequenced Learning Experiences
An Outline of Each Lesson Plan

Lesson Overview

Activities/Projects

Resources & Materials

Lesson 1:
Introduction to concepts

Driving Question:

-How are culture and personal identity represented through language arts/texts?

  • Teacher introduces big ideas to the class & assesses prior knowledge
  • Class is split into small groups to discuss, record their ideas on chart paper
  • Full class brainstorm where overlapping ideas are discovered/discussed
  • Chart paper for each group to record their ideas
  • Whiteboard or chalkboard space for teacher to share brainstorming
Lesson 2:

Gallery Walk of Culturally Diverse Texts

Driving Questions:
-What kinds of texts are normally presented to you in high school classes?

-Why do you think those are chosen?

-Are texts that are personally and culturally significant to you represented?

-What texts do you wish there was more of?

  • Teacher numbers students into groups
    (6 groups of 5)
  • Students have 15 minutes allotted to spend at each station (5 stations)
  • Students will read/listen/view the respective texts and respond to the guiding questions at each station
  • Small group discussion of ideas/findings/reactions to the texts during walk
  • 5 culturally diverse texts of a variety of modes
  • Audio/Visual technology to display any non-written texts
  • Accompanying display sheets with guiding questions and citation info for each station/text
Lesson 3:
Finish up Gallery Walk & Intro to Writing Activity

Driving Questions:
-What kinds of texts are normally presented to you in high school classes?

-Why do you think those are chosen?

-Are texts that are personally and culturally significant to you represented?

-What texts do you wish there was more of?

  • Teacher provides time for reviewing the texts from the gallery walk again
  • Teacher will introduce the writing activity expectations
  • Students will choose one text they like best/one that interests them most/that they connect with and will mimic in their own writing piece
  • Class discussion of all the texts (what did you notice, what surprised you, what did you like/not like, & why???)
  • 5 culturally diverse texts of a variety of styles/modes
  • Audio/Visual technology for any non-written texts
  • Accompanying display sheets with guiding questions and citation info for each station/text
Lesson 4:

Personal Writing Activity

Driving Questions:

-What text(s) from the gallery walk did you connect with the most?

-How might you use a text as an exemplar for your personal writing?

-What aspects of your personal identity and culture would you most like to have represented in your writing piece?

  • Teacher reviews the expectations
  • Students choose one text from gallery walk and use the mode/style/form as an exemplar and begin planning out their piece
  • Teacher will encourage students to use this writing to represent their sense of positive identity and/or their culture
  • Students will be expected to create a polished piece, but there aren’t specific expectations on what/how much they write/produce
  • Computer lab availability
  • Copies of, or access to the texts included in the gallery walk so students may refer to them to mimic
Lesson 5:

Personal Writing Activity

Driving Questions:
-What aspects of your personal identity and culture would you most like to have represented in your writing piece?

-What steps are involved in the process of personal writing?

-How do you begin writing and how do you approach steps like drafting, revising, and editing while working towards the final piece?

  • Students will continue to work on their personal writing piece in the computer lab
  • While the first lab session was mainly devoted to the planning and prewriting stages, students should now be writing a first or second draft of their personal writing piece
  • The teacher will monitor, facilitate as needed, and conference with students
  • Computer lab availability
  • Copies of, or access to the texts included in the gallery walk so students may refer to them to mimic
Lesson 6:

Personal Writing Activity

Driving Questions:
-Who will you reach out to, to help assist you in the revision process?

-How do you know when a piece is finally polished?

-How is your personal identity/culture represented in this piece?

  • As this is the final lab time, the teacher should attempt to get each student to the stage of printing/completing their final draft
  • Students may be at various points of completion but most should be revising, and/or polishing
  • Computer lab availability
  • Copies of, or access to the texts included in the gallery walk so students may refer to them to mimic
Lesson 7:

Paper Maché Masks

Driving Questions:
-Why are masks culturally significant?

-How are masks represented in different cultures?

-What do you already know

-What do you want to know more about?

-How do you think your mask might look?

  • Teacher will introduce the mask-making project and provide examples of masks from around the world
  • Class discussion about the significance of masks
  • Teacher outlines specific concepts/ideas about mask-making as a way of representing one’s identity before students begin making their own
  • Students will be reminded to bring in any specific items and/or decorations they might like to include
  • Examples of masks (physical or images/video from other cultures)
  • Powerpoint notes on mask-making history/cultural significance
Lesson 8:
Paper Maché Masks

(Students will start their final projects by creating their own mask)

Driving Questions:
-Why are masks culturally significant?

-How are masks represented in different cultures?

-What do you already know

-What do you want to know more about?

-How do you think your mask might look?

  • In groups of 4, students will cover desks with sufficient amounts of newspaper to prepare their work stations
  • Students will make a flour-water paste by mixing amounts of flour and water together
  • Students will tear newspaper into long strips
  • Students will submerge strips of paper into the flour-water mixture and then cover half of their balloon-students will need to make at least 4 layers
    • Lots of newspaper
    • Bowls
    • Flour
    • Water
    • Balloons
  • Cardboard
  • Paper/cardstock
  • Glue/Tape
  • Feathers/glitter/ sequins/decor
  • Paint/markers
  • Chopsticks/Wood
Lesson 9:
Paper Maché Masks

(Students will continue their their projects by finishing their mask and then writing a short reflection on the process)

  • Students will continue from the previous day, but will now decorate their masks as they wish
  • Allow masks to dry
  • Students will write a short, informal reflection on their enjoyment or lack thereof of the entire mask-making process
  • Same materials as listed in Lesson 8
Lesson 10:
Presentation

Driving Questions:

-How does your mask represent you?

-How do you identify with your mask?
-What have you learned about masks during this process?

-How can multimodal texts convey culture?

  • Students gather around in a sharing circle and have their masks ready to present to the class
  • Students can present their reflective text (and/or their personal writing piece) to the class to help them discuss their maks or can choose to talk freely about their masks as a representation of their cultural identity
  • Students will engage one another by questioning each other in an open dialogue after presenting
  • Students will need to bring their masks in (if they have not left them in the classroom)
  • Space for class to arrange chairs in a large sharing circle
  • Audio/Visual technology if students wish to present their personal writing piece through a multimodal device

 

EDCI 747 – Instructional Package

Exploring the Significance of
Multiple Perspectives

Subject & Grade Level:
New Media 10 (but would also be applicable to New Media 11 or other areas of ELA)

Timeline:
5 lesson (1 week) mini-unit
1 60 minute lesson – “The City” short story & quiz with class discussion
1 60 minute lesson – “The True Story of the Three Little Pigs”, discussion, and brainstorm
3 60 minute lessons – Creative Writing Activity and lab time x3 days

Summary:
In this 1 week mini-unit, students will engage in several activities in an effort to better understand the importance of considering multiple perspectives when reading, viewing, or listening to a given text. The unit will begin with an initiating activity wherein the teacher reads the short story “The City”, and then provides students with a “quiz” to demonstrate the importance of having all the information/all relevant perspectives before assessing a story. The quiz activity reveals some implicit biases and the fact that everyone makes assumptions/fills in information gaps without realizing they are doing it. The second lesson will begin with a reading of “The True Story of the Three Little Pigs” by Jon Scieszka as an example of a rewriting of a well-known story from a different perspective. The reading can segway into a class discussion of the significance of having multiple perspectives on a given topic/story. The students will be divided into groups to brainstorm other examples of stories/events where we only have 1 perspective. The third and culminating lesson for this mini-unit requires students to choose a story or event and rewrite it from a different perspective than what is already well-known. Students will be provided class time and computer lab space to complete this task.

Big Ideas: (WHY this unit is of importance to your students’ learning?)

Big Ideas:

  • People understand text differently depending on their worldview and perspectives
  • Language shapes ideas and influences others

(BC’s New Curriculum – New Media 10)

Why is this important:

  • By becoming more aware that texts represent an author’s viewpoint, students can be more critical about their reading/viewing/listening
  • Students will develop a better sense of how to recognize bias, rhetoric, and persuasion utilized in texts

Curricular Competencies

Students will be able to:

Content

Students will know and understand:

WHAT students will be learning – goals for the unit

  • Apply appropriate strategies to comprehend written, oral, visual, and multimodal texts
  • Evaluate how literary elements (such as bias, rhetoric, and persuasion) enhance and influence meaning
  • Access information from a variety of sources and evaluate its accuracy and reliability
  • Demonstrate speaking and listening skills in a variety of contexts
  • Recognize and identify the role of personal, social, and cultural values and perspectives in texts
  • Respond to text in personal, creative, and critical ways
  • Reflect on, assess, and refine texts to improve their clarity, and effectiveness for a variety of purposes and audiences
  • Features of Text
    • Bias
    • Rhetoric
    • Persuasive Techniques
  • Elements of the writing process including prewriting, as well as drafting, revising, editing, and producing a final draft

Lesson Overview

Learning Standards

Activities

Resources

Evaluation

Lesson 1:
Introduction &
“The City” Quiz

Driving

Questions:

-Would this “quiz” have been easier if you could read it vs. only listening?

-How might your interpretation of “The City” be influenced by illustrations?

-What information was missing that you inadvertently filled in on your own?

-How will this affect your future reading, viewing, and listening of texts?

Big Ideas:

People understand text differently depending on their worldview and perspectives

Language shapes ideas and influences others

Competencies:

Apply appropriate strategies to comprehend written, oral, visual, and multimodal texts

Evaluate how literary elements (such as bias/persuasion) enhance and influence meaning

Teacher tells students that they will be listening to a short story, “The City”

Teacher lets students know that they can have portions repeated to them if necessary

Teacher reads story

Teacher hands out “quiz” and reads out each question

Teacher goes over answers with class, explaining that each one should be “unknown”

Class discussion of the significance

Teacher copy of the short story “The City” with the questions and explanation of answers with it

Student copies of “The City” quiz

(x30 copies)

Teacher will determine whether students demonstrate the PLO’s by formatively assessing:

-Are students actively listening as the teacher reads the short story and asks the questions?

-Are students participating by completing the quiz?

-Are students participating in the class discussion by contributing ideas, asking questions, and making connections?

Lesson 2:

“The True Story of the Three Little Pigs”

Driving
Questions:

-What do you predict the Wolf will say in his defense?

-How do the illustrations impact your interpretation of the wolf’s POV?

-What other stories/events would benefit from another perspective?

Big Ideas:

People understand text differently depending on their worldview and perspectives

Competencies:

Access information from a variety of sources and evaluate its accuracy, and reliability

Demonstrate speaking and listening skills in a variety of contexts

Review of prev. lesson

Teacher hands out student copies of “The True Story of the Three Little Pigs”

Teacher and class read the text aloud together

Class discussion of the impact of having a different perspective on a well-known story

Teacher groups class to brainstorm more stories/events for which we only have one perspective or version

“The True Story of the Three Little Pigs” picture book by Jon Scieszka

Student handout of picture book text so they can read along (x30 copies)

Formatively assess:

Are students actively participating in the activity by reading along or volunteering to read sections aloud?

Are students participating in the class discussion by contributing ideas or by actively listening and/or taking notes?

Are students contributing to group discussion by brainstorming ideas?

Lesson 3:
Creative Writing Activity Intro

Driving

Questions:

-How do you determine what makes a good story to rewrite?

-What steps are involved in the process of creative writing?

-How do you begin writing and how do you approach steps like drafting, revising, and editing while working towards the final piece?

Competencies:

Recognize and identify the role of personal, social, and cultural values and perspectives in texts that we read

Respond to text in personal, creative, and critical ways

Reflect on, assess, and refine texts to improve their clarity and effectiveness for purpose/audience

Content Areas:

Bias, rhetoric, and persuasive techniques

Teacher will review ideas about the importance of multiple perspectives that have been generated over the previous 2 lessons

Teacher will introduce writing activity assignment wherein students will rewrite a well-known story or historical event from another perspective

Teacher will open up class discussion to help generate examples/ ideas of possible stories

Students will have computer lab time to research & write

Computer lab time booked for students to research stories or events they want to rewrite

Computer lab time also booked so students can work on and complete the writing assignment in class rather than for homework

Handout of writing assignment criteria/rubric (x30 copies)

Formatively assess:

Students ability to recognize and identify how a writer’s perspective is represented in the texts they produce, sometimes showing bias or rhetoric

Students’ writing will be evaluated based on their ability to:

-Choose a story/event to rewrite from a different perspective

-Revise and edit their writing piece on their own, via teacher conferencing, and through peer feedback

Lesson 4:

Creative Writing Activity Cont…

Driving Questions:

-What steps are involved in the process of creative writing?

-How do you begin writing and how do you approach steps like drafting, revising, and editing while working towards the final piece?

Competencies:

Recognize and identify the role of personal, social, and cultural values and perspectives in texts that we read

Respond to text in personal, creative, and critical ways

Reflect on, assess, and refine texts to improve their clarity and effectiveness for purpose/audience

Content Areas:

Bias, rhetoric, and persuasive techniques

Continuation of previous lesson

Students will continue working in the computer lab on their creative writing piece with teacher guidance and facilitation

Ideally students will be able to complete an early draft for revision and workshopping

Computer lab time booked for students to research stories or events they want to rewrite

Computer lab time also booked so students can work on and complete the writing assignment in class rather than for homework

Handout of writing assignment criteria/rubric (x30 copies)

Formatively assess:

Students ability to recognize and identify how a writer’s perspective is represented in the texts they produce, sometimes showing bias or rhetoric

Students’ writing will be evaluated based on their ability to:

-Choose a story/event to rewrite from a different perspective

-Revise and edit their writing piece on their own, via teacher conferencing, and through peer feedback

Lesson 5:

Creative Writing Activity Cont…

Driving Questions:
-What steps are involved in the process of creative writing?

-How do you begin writing and how do you approach steps like drafting, revising, and editing while working towards the final piece?

Competencies:

Recognize and identify the role of personal, social, and cultural values and perspectives in texts that we read

Respond to text in personal, creative, and critical ways

Reflect on, assess, and refine texts to improve their clarity and effectiveness for purpose/audience

Content Areas:

Bias, rhetoric, and persuasive techniques

Continuation of previous lesson

Students will continue working in the computer lab on their creative writing piece with teacher guidance and facilitation

Ideally students will be able to produce something close to a final draft for teacher conferencing

Computer lab time booked for students to research stories or events they want to rewrite

Computer lab time also booked so students can work on and complete the writing assignment in class rather than for homework

Handout of writing assignment criteria/rubric (x30 copies)

Formatively assess:

Students ability to recognize and identify how a writer’s perspective is represented in the texts they produce, sometimes showing bias or rhetoric

Students’ writing will be evaluated based on their ability to:

-Choose a story/event to rewrite from a different perspective

-Revise and edit their writing piece on their own, via teacher conferencing, and through peer feedback

Special Considerations/Prior Knowledge:

Students’ funds of knowledge regarding bias, POV, and perspective in storytelling will be assessed prior to unit, and lessons can be accommodated either way if necessary. The first lesson is aimed at introducing concepts for the first time, while also providing a fun activity (the quiz) to get students thinking critically and personally reflecting on the process. Each student should be able to participate in this activity with no issues, although accommodations could be made if needed (the quiz could be administered orally rather than written or the students could work in partners or small groups rather than individually). Similarly, the second lesson introduces and expands upon concepts to help student understanding. By providing a written copy of the text and reading it aloud as a group, the lesson facilitates different types of learning (there will also be a discussion on the importance of illustrations). The third lesson expects students to apply their learning in their own creative writing assignment. Again, if necessary, accommodations can be made. First of all, there is no set requirement of length. Rather, students choose their own text or event to rewrite and their choice will determine the style, form, and length of their writing piece. For example, If a student wishes to give another perspective of a fairy tale, they will be expected to follow (or deliberately break) fairy tale conventions. If they would rather rewrite a historical event, their writing may resemble an essay or a letter from a particular historical figure. Students are also encouraged to consider songs or films that only show one perspective – in this case, students can use their skills in music or technology to reproduce their own song or short film.

Creative Writing Assignment Assessment:
Your creative writing piece will be assessed based on the following criteria:

  • Did you choose a specific story or event to rewrite from a different perspective?
  • Have you used your exemplar text as a model for your writing (style, form, length)?
  • Have you represented a perspective that is completely new or relatively unknown?
  • Did you participate in peer editing and/or teaching conferencing during workshops?
  • Does your final piece demonstrate accurate grammar, spelling, and punctuation?

CATEGORY

Exceeds Expectations

Meets Expectations

Not Quite Meeting Expectations

Creative writing piece is inspired by a specific story or historical event You have chosen a specific story or historical event to use as inspiration for your creative writing piece You are not able to fully articulate a story or event which inspires your creative writing piece Your creative writing piece was not inspired by any specific story or event
Writing style is modeled after the exemplar text
(style, form, length)
Your creative writing piece is very clearly modeled after your exemplar text based on the style, form, and length Your creative writing piece shows some understanding of either the style, form, or length of your exemplar text Your creative writing piece does not reflect the exemplar text in any way
Creative writing piece portrays a new or unknown perspective than the original story/event Your creative writing piece represents a perspective that is not portrayed in the original text or well-known Your creative writing piece represents a perspective that is not in the original text but is fairly well-known Your creative writing piece represents a perspective which is already well-known or represented in original text
Participation in peer editing and teacher conferencing workshops You actively participated in giving and receiving peer feedback as well as meeting for teacher conferencing You participated in either peer editing or teacher conferencing, but not both You did not participate in peer editing or teacher conferencing during class workshopping time
Accurate spelling, grammar and punctuation are demonstrated in final piece There are very few or no errors in the final draft of your creative writing piece There are at least 3-5 major errors in your final draft which distract the reader There are 5+ major spelling, grammar, or punctuation errors in your final draft

 

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